PDI Perspective

Get perspective on infection prevention from PDI's experts.

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Joan Hebden, RN, MS, CIC, FAPIC

Joan received her baccalaureate and master’s degrees from the University of Maryland School of Nursing. She is currently an independent infection prevention consultant and research coordinator. She served as the Director of Infection Prevention and Control for 28 years at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. An accomplished practitioner, Ms. Hebden has presented at national epidemiology conferences, participated in research regarding the transmission of multi-drug resistant bacteria, contributed chapters on infection control to nursing resource texts, and published in medical and infection control journals. She is certified in infection control through the Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology, is an active member of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiologists of America and the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and serves as a section editor and reviewer for the American Journal of Infection Control.

Recent Posts

Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectants: Lost in Translation?

Posted by Joan Hebden, RN, MS, CIC, FAPIC on Jun 29, 2017 4:43:00 PM

 

There has been a plethora of scientific literature demonstrating that healthcare-associated pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) and Clostridium difficile, frequently contaminate both porous and non-porous surfaces in the healthcare environment.  This microbial burden on environmental surfaces serves as a reservoir for direct transmission of pathogens to the patient or as an indirect mode of transmission through contaminated reusable patient care equipment and/or healthcare workers’ hands and gloves. Along with hand hygiene and the implementation of best practices to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs), environmental cleaning is a fundamental component of a comprehensive infection prevention program.

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Chlorhexidine Gluconate for the Prevention of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections - Current Science

Posted by Joan Hebden, RN, MS, CIC, FAPIC on Jan 4, 2017 11:28:00 AM

Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) is an antibacterial antiseptic with the ability to inhibit and kill bacteria associated with healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).  In the last two decades, investigators have researched the use of CHG for hand hygiene, oral hygiene, pre-operative bathing, insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters (CVCs), and daily bathing of patients with CVCs. The rapid antimicrobial activity of CHG, in addition to the persistent and residual antibacterial effect for up to six hours on the skin, has led to recommendations for its use as a healthcare provider hand soap, showering/bathing agent prior to surgery, skin preparation agent for drawing blood cultures and for preparing the skin prior to the insertion of intravascular lines.

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